Stratosphere

Founded by independent curator/writer Ana Roman, Stratosphere dedicates itself to Contemporary Photography, Fashion Film, Music, 21st Century Modern Dance, Architecture, and Design. Stratosphere also endeavors to feature new collectors and buyers from around the world, as well as Photography Representation and Creative Consulting. The goal and philosophy of Stratosphere is to bring the future to the people, for the people. Interactive events, inventions, forecasters, futurists, and content generators who wish to be discovered should look no further. If you would like to contribute to this publication, the blog, or wish to be represented in the United States please contact Ana Roman at stratospherenyc@gmail.com ...

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Germany Germany

"Disconnect" (ft. Steffaloo)

Here is a creeper that sneaks through the shadows of your room at night, into your bed while your sleeping, hovers over you, and then wakes you up to party only to turn the lights back off and disappear.

Germany Germany is Drew Harris from Victoria BC and he completely kills this track with the help of Steffaloo.  Check more. 

(Shouts to Dre for the tip)

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Posted _TMDS_ for Stratosphere

02.29.12, 2 years ago   7 notes
The Tenants: Yoshi Kametami slips into daily life at the Muirhouse UK housing projects

"I have always looked at my time in Muirhouse as a project. But the more time I spent there the more the relationship had changed between my subjects and myself. The boundaries between photographer and subject started blurring into a friendship.”

-Yoshi Kametani

Yoshi Kametani has a particular form of bravery that I often encounter in photographers. This bravery forms out of an almost childlike curiosity and the desire to experience something which is generally understood as “off limits.” Case in point:  Most people would never wander into the projects alone in their own country, let alone a foreign country. And yet, photographers like Kametani decide to do these things, nearly without a second thought. The camera becomes the medium which allows an entry point into socially forbidden territories. From there, the photographer wielding the camera determines how long he will be able to stay and how exactly to proceed. Here, Yoshi Kametani tells us about his series, “Plastic Spoon,” revealing his experiences at the Muirhouse housing project, the complexities of documentary photography and the idea of the political versus the personal. 

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What inspired you to begin this series? Did you always have an interest in exploring this particular community and if so, why?

Before moving to Edinburgh Scotland all I new about the city was the novel Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh. The book created such a wonderfully dark world with an absurd humor. The individual stories were immersed in a plethora of detailed descriptions of daily life from the fashion, to the food, the drug, to the slang created a vivid picture of this underground Edinburgh working class heroin culture during the 90s. So the book had me wondering how much of this was pulled from Welsh’s reality. After moving to Edinburgh I found out that Welsh was raised in Muirhouse where some of the stories took place. I wanted to see the type of environment that cultivated these tails in Welsh’s imagination. That is how I ended up photographing in Muirhoue. 

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How challenging was it to build solid relationships with the people of  Muirhouse?

I didn’t find it too difficult to build solid relationships with my friends in Muirhouse. Actually every one I met was quite friendly. It may be because I stuck out like a sore thumb. The majority of the residents in Muirhouse are white and Scottish I on the other hand looked like a lost tourist. They were as interested in me as I was in them. It was almost like a cultural exchange program with drugs and violence.

In the same vain, as an outsider, how did you go about gaining the trust of the residents there? Did you have a particular strategy, or did you wing it and hope for the best?

I don’t really have any strategy because every situation is different. I just went about my day and interact with people as I do at home.

Were you familiar with the council schemes in the UK before you did this project? And how much more did you learn once you were entrenched in this project?

Well I didn’t really know much about the schemes in the whole of UK. Its like the projects in NYC would be different from the ones in LA. They all have their own characters. As I mentioned before the only think I knew about the Edinburgh schemes were from the book Trainspotting. But during my stay there I noticed more differences than similarities to the book. It was also brought to light that most of my friends from Muirhouse were not too fond of Mr. Welsh.

Did you approach this initially as a documentary project, or was your intent always to sort of become “one” with your subjects, so to speak.

You can call it a documentary of a sort. I see it more as using reality as material to create a subjective visual world (photographic or video) influenced by my experience within that reality. This is how I understand documentary.

I have always looked at my time in Muirhouse as a project. But the more time I spent there the more the relationship had changed between my subjects and myself.  The boundaries between photographer and subject started blurring into a friendship. This resulted in sensitive information and events being revealed in front of me. In order to preserve the safety of my friends along with my own I had to change the way I was shooting in certain situations. As well I did not want the project to focus mainly on those negative moments. Some of the images became more conceptualized and these events started becoming represented in objects, landscapes, and portraits.

You were born in NYC. Were there any notable or surprising differences between Muirhouse and the council schemes of the UK and say, the housing projects in New York City?

Well one of the main similarities is the fact that they were both ghettos, meaning they were both part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups. These groups tend to be working class people who cannot afford to live anywhere else.

The difference, which I found to me the most interesting, is that in NYC these groups that live in housing projects seem to be minorities of both economic position in society as well as race. Where as in Edinburgh, where the population is mainly white, the group that live in the council schemes (housing projects) are mainly white.

 This just brought to light that in the NYC we tend to focus more on racial discrimination and in the Edinburgh it seemed issue was more of the class divide. I guess either way you look at it green is green and if you have money your better off. 

I assume being there that you became friends with at least a few of the residents. Are they pictured in your work? Do you still see them or keep in touch with them?

Yeah I did make a few good friends in Muirhouse and they are all pictured in the Plastic Spoon project. I do keep in touch with them but there are a few that just disappeared.

What was the best moment/experience you had at Muirhouse?

That’s hard to say. I think I see the four years that I spent there as a chunk of my life that I cherish.

What was the worst?

I found myself in a room with four heroin addicts getting their daily fix and one of them was cradling a baby in her arms. It took me a while to realize that the situation I was in was fucked up. I guess I got a bit desensitized while working in Muirhouse because it seemed normal.

Being able to feel that this situation was normal was the worst.

Have you always been interested in addressing social issues in your photography, or was there a catalyst for turning towards that kind of work?

No. I view my work as more of a diary than a social documentary or photojournalism. But I understand that my work is political. It’s hard to separate your work from politics when you work in certain environments and deal with multiple realities. These realities that you work in are filtered through your senses, leaving an imprint of your political views and thoughts of that reality on the photograph, which is a regurgitation of those realities that you have experienced. 

Do you think photographers have a particular obligation or duty to address social issues? Is there something about photography that makes it more or less powerful to represent those issues?

I do not feel any obligation to produce the work that I produce.

Did you feel any conflict of interest between representing a “social issue” while at the same time maintaining an emotional interest in the people you are photographing?

I did. As I have mentioned above, one of the reasons for the change in aesthetics was to keep everyone who was involved safe.

Was there any point where you felt like you were pushing your boundaries too far, or pushing the residents boundaries too far? And if so how did you react to that?

I never felt that way. I don’t think I’m an aggressive person so it’s not in my nature to push anyone to do anything. 

Interview by Ana Lola Roman for Stratosphere

02.24.12, 2 years ago   2 notes

TEEEL

"Deadites"

Lush yet clear, nostalgic but forward thinking.  Vintage synths reign supreme again as Princeton based producer/artist TEEEL returns with his new LP University Heights out today 2/22.  Check it out over at his bandcamp or over at Synthemesc Records

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Posted _TMDS_ for Stratosphere

02.22.12, 2 years ago   9 notes
#Audio   #Deadites   #TEEEL   #University Heights   #chill   #dream   #electro   #indie   #pop   #electronic   
Sister Sinner: The Fashionable Faces of Andrea Mary Marshall

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As women, we know what it’s like to perform. A dab of lipstick here, a pair of high-heels there, a lit cigarette and boom! Your story ends and another begins. So goes the transformation for artist Andrea Mary Marshall, whose work explores femininity through an evolving language of archetype and exaggeration. Andrea uses tried and true feminist fodder to her advantage. Blood? Check. Sex? Check. Religion? Check. Fashion? Check.

However, unlike some other artists that utilize the same basic ingredients, Andrea manages to evoke powerful reactions with her work, without that overly judgmental feeling that seems to accompany  similar artistic projects. Instead, she takes a different approach to handling these elements. 

To illustrate my point, I’d like to share a small anecdote. A friend of mine who is now currently a holistic teacher developed what she called “a nice little coke habit” while she was working at a high-powered corporate job. After a while she realized she needed to stop, but instead of quitting cold turkey, she let herself totally loose. She said ” I let myself do it as much as I wanted all the time, everyday. I never denied myself. And then finally one day, I had no desire to do it at all.” She quit coke and corporate America all at once and now leads a quiet, happy life in a suburban town. 

Clearly this is not a strategy that I would recommend to most people, but it did get me thinking about things in a different way. Now, I tell you this story because I feel like Andrea’s work operates on the same logic as my friend’s. Her work indulges the viewer in the most extreme representations of women. It’s loud, fashionable, sexy, dark and appealing. It’s unapologetic. She’s unapologetic.

Which is something that is so great about this work. She is actually allowing herself to go to these extremes in her performance work, and it looks like she’s enjoying it. And this is something that most feminists will not admit, or do not allow themselves to show in their artwork. The truth is, being a woman is complicated and it always will be. And most women, as much as we knock the fashion industry for its impossible standards, or chafe under the weight of madonna/whore archetypes, sometimes we actually seek them out. These standards are a “bad” habit that delight and demolish us, depending on the day. However, as with most negative experiences, there’s always the opportunity to learn. Andrea is the martyr willing to follow our cultural habits into the deepest of rabbit holes in the hope of actually learning the true middle ground, or neutral point; the space where real women exist, both within and outside of our gender stereotypes and expectations. 

Each project in her “Toxic Women” exhibition reveals a slightly different face of hers. Her cover illustrations showcase a bad-ass and clever attitude, while her other drawings of fashionable archetypes are moodier. Thankfully, they all work together as a in order to serve her ultimate desire to”connect, rather than isolate the female experience and contribute to evolving, yet eternal female imagery.”

Amen sister sinner, I say Amen. 


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02.17.12, 2 years ago   5 notes

Frankie Rose

"Night Swim"

Next Tuesday, Frankie Rose will release her new LP, Interstellar on 4AD.   From the first single, "Know Me" I was hooked.  The clean, sparse, and spacious dream pop sound of Interstellar is intoxicating.  Listen for yourself here and catch her on tour.

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Posted By _TMDS_ for Stratosphere

02.15.12, 2 years ago   4 notes
#Frankie Rose   #Night Swim   #Interstellar   #4AD   #new wave   #80s   #shoegaze   #pop   #indie   #female   
Gemma Kahng: Modern Romanticism

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The ever-radiant designer, Gemma Kahng celebrated her New York Fashion Week show last night with a champagne-topped party at Double Seven in the meatpacking district. With her long, charcoal hair, and all white ensemble, it was easy to trace her gorgeous designs to her own personal style. 

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Initially, Kahng first came on to the scene in the 90s. Her romantic, yet edgy designs were immediately picked up by high-end boutiques like Bloomingdale’s and Neiman Marcus. Nowadays, she’s re-launching her own line, which we are more than a little excited about. Her Spring and Summer 2012 collection demonstrates a very feminine sense of grace with historical references peppered in the mix. The end result manages to be something uniquely glamourous, wearable and modern. 

Andrea Diaz for Stratosphere

02.10.12, 2 years ago   5 notes
Spiritual Presence: The Paintings of Emily Cheng

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     One of the beautiful things about living in New York is the ever impressive trough of talented people residing in the city. During the Gemma Kahng after-party I had the pleasure of meeting Emily Cheng, an accomplished painter.  

Looking through her paintings I recalled a passage in psychologist Carl Jung’s autobiography, Dreams, Memories, and Reflections where he explains his fascination with mandalas. He wrote “  I saw that everything, all paths I had been following, all steps I had taken, were leading back to a single point — namely, to the mid-point. It became increasingly plain to me that the mandala is the centre. It is the exponent of all paths. It is the path to the centre, to individuation. 

… I knew that in finding the mandala as an expression of the self I had attained what was for me the ultimate.”

      Emily takes a similar approach to her work, utilizing a variety of symbols ranging from from 18th century floral designs to ancient Tibetan imagery to express various internal states. No matter what the disparate images are, the effect always manages to return the viewer to a meditative place, back into their center. 

For more of Emily Cheng’s work, check out her projects here.

02.10.12, 2 years ago   1 note

Labyrinth Ear

"Amethyst Days"

This sexy little slice of earnest electro builds and builds and builds and then dissipates back from whence it came… leaving you aching for more.  

Grab your copy of the UK artist’s Apparitions EP over at bandcamp.

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Posted by _TMDS_ for Stratosphere

02.08.12, 2 years ago   28 notes

FASHION IN SPACE: PHOTOSYNTH PRESENTS “SAMILIGHT”

Emma Lundgren’s fashion film for her newest collection entitled “Samilight” directed by Javier Barcala takes a cheeky approach to the all too often over-wrought fashion film genre. In this gem, the model dances bond-girl style to a cool 60s track, sporting Lundgren’s newest designs in a sparkly space-land. It’s good to see Lundgren’s video reflect the sense of play that she incorporates into her designs. Check out more of her colorful and ornate designs here.

Andrea Diaz for PhotoSynth

02.03.12, 2 years ago   1 note

 

WOODKID: “IRON”

Yoann Lemoine has churned out some truly gorgeous videos in the recent past, including Lana del Rey’s newest video for her single “Born to Die.” Not only is Lemoine a talented filmmaker, but he’s also a gifted musician. His music video,”Iron” showcases his musical chops while simultaneously illustrating his particular photographic style. A breath-taking visual narrative in black and white, “Iron” features model Agyness Deyn and crew of equally stunning male counterparts. The video moves with such photographic power it’s impossible not to be impassioned by the song’s epic battle cry.

Andrea Diaz for PhotoSynth

02.03.12, 2 years ago
BEAUTIFUL SACRILEGE: NAMSA LEUBA RE-CONTEXTUALIZES GUINEAN SACRED OBJECTS IN THE “YA KALA BEN” SERIES, AND FINDS HER OWN RITUAL IN THE PROCESS

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It was important for me to this work because it enabled me to be more aware of the intricacy and the existence of a parallel world, that of spirits.

Namsa Leuba is an African-European photographer born in Switzerland. Her work explores the construction and deconstruction of  the body, ideas of ceremony and ritual and the relationship between the sacred and the profane. Here she tells us about her “Ya Kala Ben” series, Guinean cosmology and the photographic eye.

What led you to begin the “ Yakala Ben” photo series? Was there a particular catalyzing event that brought you towards the project, or was it something that you had thought about doing for awhile?

This trip was an opportunity to reconnect with some of my roots. I have always wanted to explore and share this other culture that is part of me. And I knew that the best way to do so was to visit the village founded by my great grandfather. This pilgrimage to the land of some of my ancestors inevitably and immediately raised the sensitive question of “origin” or “origins”. Mine, that of my parents, of others (my subjects) and of my approach.

How long did it take you to complete the series? 

My work has been realized between January and March 2011 in Guinea Conakry. It took me four months to prepare my trip with the help of my mother and my family on the ground. The preparation was extensive as I couldn’t just turn up and say “hi, I’m just taking pictures

I know when I go to Mexico ( where my family is from) I’m often struck by the cultural myths, sacred grounds and religious icons there, and that those things often reveal subtle differences about the culture I grew up in (the US), versus the culture that is actually more my heritage(Mexico). Was there anything that you felt you learned about Guinean culture that surprised you, or that you did not expect? 

The pace at which people in Guinea got things done surprised me. Everything took longer. I found myself wasting a day waiting for people to turn up. On the second day I took off my watch to be able to relate. I therefore learned how to work at the guinean pace. The systematic lateness of models posed some technical problems; for instance, the changing of light during the day as at certain times it becomes harder.

- To be able to enter a sacred forest, normally reserved for the few initiated, I received, after long negotiations, an “express” introduction which after all took a day to complete.

You said at times you had to deal with “sometimes violent reactions from Guineans who viewed my procedures/practices as a form of sacrilege.” Was there any point when you thought about giving up your project, and if not, what kept you going? 

I never thought about giving up my project which was very dear to me. It was also an important part of my degree.

I think the relationship between the sacred and the profane is a very interesting one. What was your relationship to the Guinean cosmology before the trip, and how did it evolve through your making of these images?

All I knew before the trip was that my mother is muslim and that my father is a protestant, although I’ve not been baptized. The religious aspect of my mother’s country became very prominent. I discovered an animist side to the Guinean culture which is based on people’s respect for it. I had been exposed to supernatural part of Guinea as since I was a child, I visited ‘marabouts’ (some type of witches) and this time around took part in many ceremonies and rituals. And for me it was important to do this work, because now i feel more aware of this situation, the existence of a parallel world, and the world of spirit. It was important for me to this work because it enabled me to be more aware of the intricacy and the existence of a parallel world, that of spirits.

I think it’s interesting that part of the reason these images are sacrilegious is because you’ve desecrated ritual tools by showing them in human form, in body. How do you tend to approach the body in your work?

In what is retroactive look at my pictures, it reminds us of the statuettes and look at what the statuettes (object) we think a human figure. When we look at my pictures in retroactive, it makes us think of statuettes and we look at the statuettes (artifact) we think of a human figure. Behind my pictures we see the statuettes even though they are humanized. We animate the statuettes (artifact), by thinking of human figure. Under my pictures there are statuettes, in the statuettes exist the humans/ the human image. The retroactive image is not the immediate picture(image), but what is behind it, behind the picture and my experience.

Artists like Francis Alys have played with the idea that in the secular west, artworks take the place of “sacred” or ritual objects. Does this factor into your mode of creating or thinking about these photographs? 

I am particularly interested in fetishes. My approach is to separate those sacred statuettes from their religious context in order to immortalized them in a Western framework.“They are ritualistic tools that I have animated by giving them an unusual meaning in the Guinean context”.

What, if anything, do you hope to accomplish from “recontextualizing these sacred objects through the lens”?

By being present in those places, my view on those symbols as well as their use, my bachelor work in photography could be considered as my own ritual. I came to decontextualize them and give them another meaning by questioning their structure of origin and therefore their meaning.

What was the most challenging thing, physically, psychologically, or mentally in creating these images and bringing this project into fruition?

It was to stay focused on my goal, to not get carried away during the ceremonies and rituals. To stay alert and to not be completely in trance.

What are some standout attitudes that differ between western aesthetic culture and Guinean aesthetic culture?

Avoiding the generalization, Guinean esthetic is a lot more distinguished by sculpted wood craft, leather, etc. by the colonial western esthetic, the rounded furniture with coil and embellishments.It is basically Chinese industrials and Lebanese merchants who dictate esthetic preferences. Guineans have less the need and the means to always change their accessories like the westerns.

Ana Lola Roman for Stratosphere

02.02.12, 2 years ago   8 notes
DO NOT BUY THIS COLORING BOOK: The ‘Police Brutality Coloring Book’ created by Joe Heaps Nelson

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The night Ana Roman meets Joe Heaps:

In a December 2011 text message delivered to the writer, Ana Roman, Joe Heaps Nelson mused: “Come Join us. I am with the exotic one.” I was prevented from doing so.

I finally meet Mr. Heaps. A contained, elegant, prostrate on both legs, and perfectly unloaded Heaps appears before me on an anonymous January night. A good friend, we’ll call him Dick Sherbert, warned me about Mr. Heaps. But it was all in good fun. It is happenstance that I have not been left alone with Heaps yet. A girl can only pray.

Heaps, as most whisper scandalously behind their hand know, is portrayed as a mythical character. But the writer is still left waiting for the mythos. There is a lot of story-booking and image making in the art world, so my earth sense tells me that Heaps’ actions are put into his own mythos. Hence his curated and DIY produced Police Brutality Coloring book. In this wonderful, innocent, creation, we will see contributions by Shepard Fairey, Stratosphere’s own Maya Hayuk, and Whitehot Magazine’s Noah Becker.

Selling the Contraband:

Heaps, in a fit of inspiration, put together the Police Brutality Coloring book in a little under a week—just in time for Art Basel Miami. As many resourceful artists do, Heaps borrowed money for a plane ticket from his sister and started to sell the books around Miami. His treasures were freshly released from the confines of his backpack for as little as $10 smackers a piece. All told, 65 copies were sold. “I gave some away if people didn’t have 10 bucks for one,” he said.

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Shepard Fairey

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Ryan Ford

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Kevin Bourgeois

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Chase Winkler

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Adam Suerte

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Maya Hayuk

The idea to create this gentle weapon of brutality arose during a conversation between Heaps and Anton Newcombe, lead singer of Brian Jonestown Massacre. He also asked Noah Becker, friend and editor of the arts website Whitehot Magazine, to lend a hand. Becker told Wired.com, “and in the midst of me drawing, Shepard Fairey called to say he was really excited about the idea. Then things just took off.”

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Anonymous

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George Boorujy

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Sam Trioli

It is an amazing feat in this day in an age to organize 46 of some of the most influential artists and thinkers walking amongst the living of today. This 48 page DIY publication has been curated as an emotional response to the incidents of violent police action against last year’s Occupy Wall Street activists.

"I wasn’t directly involved with movement, but I had been down there a few times and was sympathetic to the cause," Heaps told Wired.

All in all, the writer thinks that although Heaps has had a whirlwind of gentle infamy afloat amongst his person, he still remains a blustery Jesus. With or without the brutality.

Posted by Ana Roman for Stratosphere

01.24.12, 2 years ago   14 notes
Weegee’s ‘Murder is my Business’ Series: Tabloid Tales or Immortal Relics of History?

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

In 2012 many freelance photographers earn their ‘stars’ or ‘badges,’ of honor with as little of a click, upload, and compression in Photoshop. And there you have it. A righteous blog post for the throngs of consumers to see.

There is an automated response to pictorial storytelling that no longer recalls a time when grit, guts, and balls reared its honorable face. Weegee reminds us all that no matter the camera, sentiment, or method, it’s perfectly fine for stories to exist without being sanctified, patronized, and pacified—-rightfully on their own.

Weegee’s ‘Murder is my Business’ exhibit, currently on view at The International Center of Photography points to that epochal period in New York City (1935 to 1946) when murder and scandal fed the hungry fiendish readers of New York City’s finest sad rag  papers. The tabloids were tried, true, and tested. But did Weegee shoot with tabloid intentions? Not rightfully so, but when he did, it was ever so gracefully.  Clearly, Weegee was gearing up to slap the beautiful relics of history with an ugly taste of New York City reality. And the photographs never once apologize for it.

Every morning, like a freshly blossomed black eye, there’s Weegee’s bravest relic, gracing the page. Always from the previous nights’ night court session, you can taste the happiness of corruption slapping your face with that first cup of coffee. Envision Weegee sitting in his room, 3 AM, scratching himself, looking at his daily prizes under the light, emerged in his tearsheets and laughing out loud. Hot damn.

Violent holdups, sweaty brawls, freshly shot bodies on a 5th avenue sidewalk, there’s no shame in it. Shoot it, crop it, sign it, deliver it. Have it served with the next morning’s breakfast, for all we care. Eggs NOT over easy? Just sit back and digest it.

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

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Weegee/International Center of Photography

Don’t look away. This is how it was and how it will always be.  There’s a beauty in brutality that reigns supreme in Weegee’s work.  The crumbs of whisky, strains of jazz, and visual puns produce a body of work that will teach future generations not to look away. Touring the exhibit there is a heady mixture of pride and prize-winning acts of bravery. He challenges everyone, even now, to overcome, shoot, and tell the truth. Even if it’s saved for the tabloid, or locked inside the annals of history.

Posted by Ana Roman for Stratosphere

01.21.12, 2 years ago   8 notes

21ST CENTURY DANCE FRIDAYS: THE VIDEOS OF DOMINIQUE PALOMBO

There once was a time where philosophers, artists and various wise men championed the idea that all plastic arts must remain separate from each other to retain their own purity. According to these people, there was no greater sin for one particular visual medium, like painting to exhibit the qualities of another medium, like photography, and combining mediums was definitely not allowed.

That was then, but this is now.

I present to you three videos by French director, Dominique Palombo.

 

"MOVE"

I found his video for designer, Rachel Roy, entitled “Move” while I was hunting for fashion films. And then it struck me how utterly perfect this video would be for our 21st century dance Fridays. In “Move,” contemporary dance takes center stage to showcase Rachel Roy’s designs. The choreography is fresh, the edits are clean and the clothes move in interesting ways. In many contemporary fashion films, including Palombo’s, we see that dance is no longer confined to the stage. We don’t necessarily have to buy tickets to the ballet to see quality choreography. In fact we don’t even have to be dance enthusiasts to appreciate the beauty of Palombo’s work. We are aware that there is dance happening, but it becomes more about the dance as a part of a visual language to serve the greater artistic vision, rather than pure dance for it’s own sake.

 

"Seeing Red"

"Contact"

Andrea Diaz for PhotoSynth

01.20.12, 2 years ago   1 note

21ST CENTURY DANCE FRIDAYS: CHARLIE LE MINDU FASHION FILM

Yet another example of dance being integrated into mainstream visual culture, Chris Sweeny’s film for Charlie Le Mindu’s fashion demonstrates the powerful impact dance can have on the viewer. The video’s visuals are wonderfully crisp and photographic. Unfortunately, the music, which is meant to be driving, actually ends up being too epic for its own good, moving the video into a realm that’s uncomfortably movie trailer-esque. While it’s a shame that the audio distracts from the genuinely breath-taking quality of the images, it’s still a very potent representation of fashion, video and movement.

Andrea Diaz for PhotoSynth

01.20.12, 2 years ago   3 notes
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